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and democratic attorney general. one of our two u.s. senators was an independent, elected twice. an independent missed winning the governorship by 15,000 votes over a million passed in 1973. we were the ticket splitting capital of america. we have cents settled back into partisan voting with the rest of america. this is a very polarized era. having said that, when you have close elections you still have a band of voters who will mix and match on the ballot, either because they want to mix and match or they are simply reacting to the individual candidates. in the case of romney and kaine, i have personally been in situations where straw votes were taken among large groups and you generally find you have 3, 4, 5% of the romney boaters picking tim kane for various reasons. some of these romney voters are more moderate republicans and the like tim kane better than his opponent. are there similar voters for obama and george allen? i am sure there are. i never met one of them. but i will say this -- george allen, despite what happened in 2006, he has won from time to time in running for statewide off
the biggest impact in the u.s.? >> one of the most powerful campaigns was the trayvon martin case. a 17-year-old african-american, killed in florida, tragically. two weeks after the incident, there was no media coverage of all. a private injustice. the parents start a petition, and then it goes viral. the importance is not just the individual acts of arresting his killer in prosecuting him, but the public. the result, the awareness of the tragic situation of young african-americans not being treated fairly in the justice system or the "stand your ground" laws, where you can almost impunitively shoot someone. that is some of the really exciting things we see. >> in trayvon martin's case, clearly there was an impact, but they were not waiting. they were in there pretty soon, on the case. what i want to ask you -- do you find a difference in the way that companies -- you have a lot of petitions aimed at companies that do specific things. obviously, some have had more political implications. is there a difference in response between business institutions and political institutions? >> politician
back to that expert, mark twain. he says about music what i would say about the u.s.-china relationship. --said about wagner's music he was a great music critic. britney spears'spair not asand said, "it's good as it looks." [laughter] >> thank you. >> let me pick up on a point he made earlier. it is a complex idea. a great challenge that we face and might face is managing this relationship. in this context, i want to stress what i see as two of the major issues of challenge. first, the internal challenge. we tend to assume that china is growing at an% a year -- 10% per year, but i think that is wrong. i think we will see a combination of economic and internal political reasons. china is entering, my guess is a very difficult period. the society has outgrown the political system that brought the revolution. we have seen decided grow in the way it has. it has substantial measure because of its economic growth. i like to do this when i give talks about china. this is one of the most revolutionary technologies of any kind -- cell phone. it is relevant because there are millions of cell phon
of the national senatorial committee made a statement this morning regarding last night. u.s. senator john cornyn tonight made the following statement. here is the "new york times" and how they played last night's election. here is the, "wall street journal." the "washington times." andy "washington post" -- and the "washington post." cynthia on the democrat's line, good morning. caller: my view is how to do with the racism. there is a much divisiveness in terms of the racism. in order for both parties to move ahead, i think that's something needs to be done there. there is racism, and the other topic was how women were huge, especially by the republicans. women are people prepared -- our people. god gave us all the power to think on our own and there is nowhere that he says women cannot make choices. and men, especially on the republican side, are going to have to realize that women should be able to say what we allow with our bodies and not allow. host: can you give us an example of what you mean by racism in yesterday's election? caller: racism in terms of black and white, hispanic -- host: yo
and three u.s. territories are on the ground. 90% of those are volunteers. last night about 7600 people stayed in more than 110 shelters. to date, we have served more than 3.3 million meals. in fact, provided more than 29,000 health services and mental health, emotional support, and handed out 125,000 relief items. we are mobilizing a large relief effort this weekend, providing comfort kits and other import materials to those who will need them in the coming days. you have a lot of questions, so that i will turn it back over to it had 34 questions. thank you. >> thank you. we will be taking questions from reporters. i ask that you ask one question so we can get to as many as possible today. with that, operator, can we have our first question please? >> if you want to ask a and pleas deess * 1 yearning. one moment. -- and please state your name. what mom. the first question comes from jeffs. >> want to ask about temporary housing. i know out on staten island today have no hotels or motels. where are you putting those people? are they going to another state or other boroghs in new york? >
for minority communities in the u.s.. this is hosted by the joint center for political and economic studies. is just over 50 minutes. >> good morning and welcome. thank you for being here. i am the founder and president of this organization. it is an organization that has been a strategic communications but is not partisan. i am very honored and delighted to have a terrific set of panelists to -- to offer the audience today. we have to audiences today inside the capital area in a hearing room of the foreign affairs committee. i would like to thank -- >> this is the program we just showed you. we apologize for that. we do mean to show you the event for the joint center for political and economic studies. this is the one looking at the impact of the african-american vote this year. >> battleground states. analysts will continue to look at and interpret the results for some time to come, but i was struck last night by several things. the fact that the president was able to hold onto his vote totals from 2008 in a number of key battleground areas despite much speculation that he would be hurt b
election. host: hillary clinton would be the best prepared candidate. one who has lived in the u.s. senate, a woman who knows virtually every head of state in the world and is a strong opinion of the inclusion of -- social inclusion. i come close but will not talk about that until hillary -- people decide what to do. >> what is your decision making process moving forward -- her process moving card forward? guest: i supported her in 2008 over barack obama. she ran for president, i would be very excited. i have to say i played for time out. here is what is wrong. if we in the media start speculating right now about 2016, even about 2014, we're not doing our jobs. i got to say that because what is wrong with this country is a perpetual campaign. it is not supposed to work that way. you have a campaign and you fought like hell for you believe then and you win or lose in the new take time out to govern. that is what these people across the street have to do. not in campaign mode but in governing mode. six problems, especially the fiscal and immigration reform. i sound like i am preaching the ta
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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